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Final Exam Identifications, Essay Questions, and Rubric

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Instructions

Part One: Identifications (10 points each; 200 points total)

This section requires you to write short answers to each identification question. There are 20 identification questions worth 10 points each for 200 points total. Each answer must address who, what, when, where, and why in the identification.

Each answer should be no more than one paragraph in length (4-5 sentences or 150 – 200 words), double-spaced with 1-inch margins using 12 point Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman font. You are not required to include citations. Each answer must:

· Identify the individual named, author, event, and other key individuals and groups (2 points)

· Discuss what the identification term or name is about (2 points)

· Describe when it occurred (1 point)

· Describe where it occurred (1 point)

· Explain why the individual, group, or event is significant for understanding African American Studies (4 points)

Listed below are twenty identification terms you will need to answer in Part One of the exam. You must answer all twenty terms to receive full credit. 
DO NOT copy and paste language from classroom resources or any other source. This is an act of plagiarism and is a violation of the academic integrity pledge you signed in Week 1.

The twenty identification terms are drawn from Weeks 5-8 of the AASP 201 classroom resources. Please use your class readings first to answer the terms before resorting to outside sources.

1. 227

2. Black Panther Party

3. Nadir

4. Ella Baker

5. “Sermon at Temple Israel of Hollywood”

6. “Message to Grassroots”

7. John Lewis

8. The Cosby Show

9. National Association of Black Journalists

10. Browder v. Gayle

11. “Black University”

12. Civil Rights Act of 1964

13. “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”

14. Voting Rights Act of 1965

15. Black Women’s Studies

16. James E. Wright

17. Stokely Carmichael

18. Greg Carr

19. “the American Dilemma”

20. Carter G. Woodson

Part Two: Essay (100 points)

You are required to answer one of two essay questions described below. The essay portion must be 4-5 pages in length, double-spaced, numbered, include 1-inch margins, use 12-point Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman font.

Your essay must include a Works Cited page. The citation style of the Works Cited page may be either Chicago, APA, or MLA. The selected citations must be appropriate to the exam topic and the citations must support the assertions made in the exam.

Your essay will include three main parts—the Thesis/Introduction, Argument, and Conclusion.

The Introduction section should clearly state the thesis within the first 1-2 paragraphs. The thesis must be relevant and appropriate to the argument and demonstrate an accurate and complete understanding of the question. This section should make it clear which question you are answering, but it should do more than restate the question by offering a brief response and it should be free of grammar and spelling errors.

The Argument section (3-4 pages) should incorporate pertinent details from the assigned readings but you may also use outside readings. The section must provide relevant historical evidence to support the thesis and the key claims made in the argument as needed. It should maintain focus and avoid sidetracking. It should present your answer to the question clearly and concisely in an organized manner and it should be free of grammar and spelling errors.

The Conclusion section should be in the last part of your essay exam within the last 1-2 paragraphs. It should briefly restate the thesis and summarize the main points of the argument. It should also demonstrate insight and understanding regarding the question asked and it should be free of grammar and spelling errors.

A scoring rubric for the essay portion is included below. Please answer one of the essay questions below:

1. Despite the expansive and innovative work of historians and other scholars over the past two decades, popular histories of the Civil Rights Movement still tend to have a limited focus. In these popular histories, there is a focus on the 1950s and 1960s with a limited cast of characters, most notably Martin Luther King, Jr. Using readings from this course (Weeks 1 – 8), how would you combat these popular histories and expand the narrative of the Civil Rights Movement? Items you should address in your answer: time period of the movement (when does it begin? when does it end?), organizations involved in the movement, important turning points, leaders and grassroots activists that should be included. Feel free to address other subject areas that you feel are important to tell a more complete story of the Civil Rights Movement. Lastly, in your conclusion, address why it is important to have an expansive view of the Civil Rights Movement that extends beyond the 1950s and 1960s.

2. As noted by historian Martha Biondi, scholars of African American studies often use their work and the resources of their institutions to address the crises facing the black community. These crises have included mass incarceration, healthcare, police brutality, education, employment, affordable housing, etc. Select TWO of the crises facing the black community in 2022 from the list provided in the previous sentence. Discuss how research and education in African American studies can AND should be used to combat these issues. In answering this question, consider how the materials you have read in this course (Weeks 1 – 8) have highlighted important information and context needed to understand these crises. Additionally, discuss what information is missing and what additional context is needed to appropriately understand how these issues plague African Americans. Lastly, in your conclusion, address why additional research and education in African American studies is important to combat your selected issues. 

 

Criteria

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanics – 10 points (5 criteria):

4-5 double-spaced pages in length; pages are numbered; 1 inch margins included; 12 point Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman font used; a cover page with identifying information included

All 5 criteria are present with 0-1 error = 9-10 points

4 of 5 criteria are present OR all 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors = 8 points

3 of 5 criteria are present OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors = 7 points

2 of 5 criteria are present OR 3 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with 6-7 errors = 6 points

0 or 1 of 5  criteria are present OR 2 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR 3 of 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 6-7 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with more than 7 errors = 5 points

Citations – 10 points (5 criteria):

Works Cited page included; appropriate citation style used; selected sources are appropriate to the topic; citations support assertions made in the essay; footnotes/endnotes used in instances where detailed explanations would distract from the argument

All 5 criteria are present with 0-1 error = 9-10 points

4 of 5 criteria are present OR all 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors = 8 points

3 of 5 criteria are present OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors = 7 points

2 of 5 criteria are present OR 3 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with 6-7 errors = 6 points

0 or 1 of 5  criteria are present OR 2 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR 3 of 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 6-7 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with more than 7 errors = 5 points

Thesis/Introduction – 10 points (5 criteria):

Clearly stated within the first 1-2 paragraphs; relevant & appropriate to the argument; demonstrated an accurate & complete understanding of the question(s); did more than restate the question(s) & offer a brief response; free of grammar & spelling errors

All 5 criteria are present with 0-1 error = 9-10 points

4 of 5 criteria are present OR all 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors = 8 points

3 of 5 criteria are present OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors = 7 points

2 of 5 criteria are present OR 3 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with 6-7 errors = 6 points

0 or 1 of 5  criteria are present OR 2 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR 3 of 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 6-7 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with more than 7 errors = 5 points

Argument – 60 points (5 criteria)

Incorporated pertinent details from assigned coursework & outside readings when permitted; provided relevant historical evidence to support the thesis & key claims in the argument as needed; maintained focus & avoided being sidetracked; presented answer clearly & concisely in an organized manner; 3-4 pages in length and free of grammar and spelling errors

All 5 criteria are present with 0-1 error = 54-60 points

4 of 5 criteria are present OR all 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors = 48-53 points

3 of 5 criteria are present OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors = 42-47 points

2 of 5 criteria are present OR 3 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with 6-7 errors = 36-41 points

0 or 1 of 5  criteria are present OR 2 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR 3 of 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 6-7 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with more than 7 errors = 35 points

Conclusion – 10 points (5 criteria)

Clearly stated within the last 1-2 paragraphs; briefly restated the thesis; summarized the main points of the argument; demonstrated  insight & understanding regarding the question(s); free of grammar & spelling errors

All 5 criteria are present with 0-1 error = 9-10 points

4 of 5 criteria are present OR all 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors = 8 points

3 of 5 criteria are present OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors = 7 points

2 of 5 criteria are present OR 3 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with 6-7 errors = 6 points

0 or 1 of 5  criteria are present OR 2 of 5 criteria are present with 2-3 errors OR 3 of 5 criteria are present with 4-5 errors OR 4 of 5 criteria are present with 6-7 errors OR all 5 criteria are present with more than 7 errors = 5 points

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For the ID section, work on expanding your statements of significance so that they are specific and detailed. Also, consult course readings FIRST for each term so that you are including the relevant information that we have read/discussed. For example, your definition of Talented Tenth includes no discussion of DuBois or who originally coined the term, both elements found in our readings. There were similar instances throughout your ID section.

· Final Examination Tip #3: Citations

Class,

I am re-sharing this post from earlier in our course for those who are still struggling with their citations. This information should be applied to the essay portion of the Final Exam:

For those who still need guidance on how to properly cite information in their discussion posts, I am providing some helpful links from the Poorvu Center for Teaching and Learning at Yale University. Please review at your convenience and make sure that you are using in-text citations and/or footnotes where appropriate in your posts. In-text citations and/or footnotes should accompany your Works Cited or Bibliography page/list at the end of your posts and other writings for this course.

1. Warning: When You Must Cite- 
https://poorvucenter.yale.edu/undergraduates/using-sources/understanding-and-avoiding-plagiarism/warning-when-you-must-cite

2. Signaling Sources in the Body of a Paper (or Discussion Post)- 
https://poorvucenter.yale.edu/undergraduates/using-sources/principles-citing-sources/signaling-sources-body-paper

For additional resources from UMGC, visit the Library’s Writing and Citing page: 
https://libguides.umgc.edu/gethelp/writing-citing

·

·
Final Examination Tip #2: Writing a Strong Thesis Statement

Class,

As you prepare your Final Examinations for submission, take some time to review your thesis statement for the essay portion. A strong thesis statement answers the question asked and provides a detailed and specific argument. Consult the following web page for further assistance: 
https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/thesis-statements/
.

·
Final Examination Tip #1: Common Errors

Class,

Please consult the tips listed below. These tips address some common mistakes found in the Identification section of the Midterm Examination.

1. Edit, edit, edit! Before you submit your exam, please check for spelling and grammatical errors (proper capitalization, proper punctuation, proper text formatting, no run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, etc.).

2. Identifications should be written using complete sentences. Do not use bullet points.

3. Use course readings FIRST when writing your responses. Using Google and other databases/search engines to search for terms will not always provide the details discussed in our course readings.

4. Your statement of significance for each term should be clear and specific. Avoid vague responses and provide detail. This portion of your Identification relies heavily upon YOUR analysis based upon our readings and discussions. Also, keep in mind that being “the first” is not a sufficient answer.

· Like Canaries in the Mines: Black Women’s Studies at the Millennium

Link

· Controversial Blackness: The Historical Development & Future Trajectory of African American Studies

Link

· The Contours of Black Studies in American Public Schools

Link

· UN Report on US Human Rights Record

Link

Malcolm X was going to speak to the United Nations about human rights abuses in the United States in 1964. In March 2014, the United Nations did issue such a report.

· Martin Luther King’s Vision of American Democracy

Link

Please read this article which reflects on the African American experience and Dr. King’s vision of American progress.

· Black Thought in the Hour of Chaos

Link

This 90-minute panel presentation focuses on Cornel West, a popular scholar of African American Studies, and the publication of his 2014 book, Black Prophetic Fire. The panel features Imani Perry and Eddie Glaude, two professors of African American Studies at Princeton University. 

· “Black Power’s Powerful Legacy,” by Peniel E. Joseph, PhD.

Link

· FBI Surveillance and Infiltration – A Repository of Primary Documents from the FBI

Link

· National Association of Black Journalists

Link

· “Black Family Imagery and Interactions on Television”

Link

· The Civil Rights Act, 1964 Did Not End the Movement for Equality

Link

Please read this resource which examines the background and impact of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

· Various Readings: Voting Rights Act of 1965

Link

The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights provides information on the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

· “North Carolina Shows Why the Voting Rights Act is Still Needed”

Link

The article “North Carolina Shows Why the Voting Rights Act is Still Needed” explains how the repeal of a certain section of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) will harm minorities’ ability to vote in North Carolina.

· “John Lewis: Return the Soul to VRA.”

Link

The Root explores the ramifications of recent changes to the VRA by interviewing Congressman John Lewis in “John Lewis: Return the Soul to VRA.”

· Speeches by Civil Rights Leaders: John F. Kennedy, June 11, 1963. Televised Speech

Link

t would be naive to think that all African Americans felt the same way about integration and racial progress in the 1950s and 1960s. Here, we’ll look at the seminal speech by President John Kennedy that steered the federal government from maintaining a “hands-off” policy to taking an active role in supporting equality for African American citizens.

· Speeches by Civil Rights Leaders: John Lewis, August 28, 1963

Link

John Lewis gave a speech at the March on Washington. He was the youngest speaker, and was urged by the march organizers to tone down his speech, which they deemed too radical.

· Speeches by Civil Rights Leaders: Malcom X, November 10, 1963. “Message to Grassroots”

Link

For Malcolm X’s opinion on where the civil rights movement was headed, read “Message to Grassroots,” Nov. 10, 1963

· Speeches by Civil Rights Leaders: Martin Luther King, Jr., February 26, 1965. “Sermon at Temple Israel of Hollywood”

Link

Read Martin Luther King, Jr.’s sermon delivered on February 26, 1965 at Temple Israel of Hollywood.

· Speeches by Civil Rights Leaders: Stokely Carmichael

Link

Read Stokely Carmichael’s speech, delivered in October 1966, titled, “Black Power Address at UC Berkeley.”

· Speeches by Civil Rights Leaders: Ella Baker

Video

Watch this YouTube clip of Ella Baker explaining her philosophy on how to make change happen.

· African-American History Timeline

Link

Review the timeline for dates between 1900 and 1935.

· Ferris State University: Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia

Link

Take the virtual tour of the Museum. In reviewing the website, go to the “The Museum” tab at the top of the page and review both “The Exhibits” and “Caricatures” sections.

· NPR: Great Migration: The Africa-American Exodus North

Link

National Public Radio (NPR) Fresh Air host Terry Gross interviews author Isabel Wilkerson about her book, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration. Read the transcript of the interview: Great Migration: The African-American Exodus North.

· The Niagara Movement and the NAACP: Growing Legal and Social Power

Link

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at the MacMillan Center at Yale University publishes the text of Niagara’s Declaration of Principles, 1905.

· National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP): 100 Years of History

Link

Read “NAACP: 100 Years of History.” Browse the links at the top of the page to read about the people who made a difference in the history of the NAACP.

· National Association for the Advancement of Colored People: The Crisis Magazine

Link

The Crisis is a magazine started by Du Bois at NAACP.

· National Association for the Advancement of Colored People: Birth of a Nation and Black Protest

Link

The NAACP’s response to the movie Birth of a Nation (1915), which is based on Thomas Dixon’s book The Clansman.

· National Association for the Advancement of Colored People: Charles Hamilton Houston

Link

Please read this short biography of Charles Hamilton Houston

· The Harlem Renaissance – 1919-1940

Link

Look at the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Black and White Images. Put the word “Harlem” in the search engine. Review the images of Harlem from 1943.

· Harlem Renaissance

Link

· Plays and Opera: Mixing White and Black Cultures and Caricatures

External Learning Tool

Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960) was one of the most dynamic writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Take a look at Three Plays: Lawing and Jawing; Forty Yards; Woofing by Hurston. Note that she uses some of the very caricatures of African Americans we saw in the Jim Crow Museum. Her work shows how deeply engrained in African American cultural norms were those stereotypes. You may want to look at how African American audiences responded to Hurston’s plays in the 1930s. Did Hurston play with the stereotypes for humor or empowerment of the African American audience?

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